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Plagiarism: Is it plagiarism?

Is it plagiarism?

The quotation below is from Joanna Burkhardt's article "Do's and don'ts for moving a small academic library." After reading the original source material, look at the examples of how this information might be used in a research paper.

 

Original

Library literature offers wide-spectrum coverage on planning and moving libraries. Authors offer visions of what might be, practical implementation suggestions, or explicit instruction for specific situations. Every move is different and offers its own set of challenges. Planning and moving into a new library can be a nightmare with long-range challenges, or a sweet dream of perfect coordination and timing.

Joanna M. Burkhardt, "Do's and don'ts for moving a small academic library", College and Research Libraries News 59, no. 7 (July/August 1998): 499.


Example 1

Library literature offers wide-spectrum coverage on planning and moving libraries. Authors offer visions of what might be, practical implementation suggesions, or explicit instructions for specific situations. Every move is different and offers its own set of challenges. Planning and moving into a new library can be anightmare with long-range challenges, or a sweet dream of perfect coordination and timing. (Burkhardt, 1998)

Is this example correct? We have used in-text citation to properly credit the original author. Missing, however are the quotation marks that indicate this passage is a direct quotation (word for word, including punctuation).

Corrected Example 1

"Library literature offers wide-spectrum coverage on planning and moving libraries. Authors offer visions of what might be, practical implementation suggesions, or explicit instructions for specific situations. Every move is different and offers its own set of challenges. Planning and moving into a new library can be a nightmare with long-range challenges, or a sweet dream of perfect coordination and timing." (Burkhardt, 1998)


Example 2

"Library literature offers much information on planning and moving libraries. Authors offer their thoughts on what might be, practical implementation suggestions, or explicit instructions for specific situations. Every move is different and offers its own set of challenges. Planning and moving into a new library can be a nightmare or a sweet dream of perfect coordinaiton and timeing." (Burkhardt, 1998)

In this example we have in-text citation to credit the original author and we have used quotation marks which indicate direct quotation of the original. Is this a direct quotation? No. Because words have been changed and/or eliminated from the original this example would be incorrect. Can we correct this example by simply removing the quotation marks?

We've learned that a paraphrase of the original material does not require quotation marks - but is this example really a paraphrase? Has the writer used her own language and sentence structure to restate the author's original ideas? In this case the answer is no. Simply replacing a few words here and there is not proper paraphrase.

Corrected Example 2

Moving into a new library takes much planning and forethought. The literature is full of articles of practical and theoretical advice regarding this topic. Each situation is different and must be handled according to the specifics of the location. Creating a new library may be very easy or very hard. (Burkhardt, 1998)

 

 


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